Say Cheese: Jarlsberg

cheese

 

We here at Fiesta Farms love cheese, all kinds. In the past we’ve profiled Fifth Town CheeseOka and Devil’s Rock Creamy Blue, and today we’re giving some love to one of the great Norwegian cheeses-one that was not even available in North America until the nineteen sixties and has since become the most popular imported cheese in the United States. Continue »



Summer Fresh!

CUxRnDxUEAAgC7c

 

Here we are in the middle of February, in the season where nothing is growing outdoors, our root cellars are stodgy with potatoes and turnips and winter squash and summer seems both a long time ago and a long time away. So when a product comes along with the name “Summer Fresh” we take notice; there are two things we like about that name!

Recognizing a need to make fresh, gourmet salads available in supermarkets, Susan Niczowski started her business with her mother in 1991 in Woodbridge, Ontario and hasn’t looked back; by 2012 Summer Fresh Salads was raking in a hundred million a year and had become Canada’s leading brand of fresh prepared foods like hummus, dips and salads, and now has a library of over 2,000 products distributed all across North America. Continue »



A Better Way To Do Laundry – Without Detergent!

Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 3.09.21 PM

 

It is no secret that by and large, the majority of Canadians are addicted to the convenience of disposable items, so it is heartening to see ordinary citizens like Latelin Leblond and Tara Smith-Arnsdorf doing something about it.

Most of us grew up aware of the three “R”s; reduce, reuse and recycle, but darn it, it seems that for every good idea that comes along there is another more insidious convenience that makes any of the three “R’s unsavoury; disposable diapers, throw away excessive packaging, disposable single-serving coffee makers are among the most ubiquitous examples of our disposable values. There are countless ways to reduce and reuse and recycle, and to these we should add another few “R”s: rethink, retrain and replace. Rethink the way we consume and the way we waste, retrain ourselves to get used to a new (often “old”) way of doing things, and replace certain environmental practices and products with (let’s call them “unvironmental”) sustainable choices and actions. It’s really simple, but as we know, simple and easy are two different words. Continue »



Aqua Greens

static1.squarespace

 

Wouldn’t it be cool if the Greater Toronto Area had a facility that raised organic fish from hatchling to market size, that grew organic greens and veggies year round using 90% less water than conventional farming methods? Well, there is such a place, it’s located just north of Pearson Airport and it’s called Aqua GreensContinue »



Our Proud Producers: Oka Cheese

oka-classique

 

Since 1893, some of the best cheese in the world has been made at The Abbey of Notre Dame du Lac at Deux –Montagnes Quebec, a monastery that at its peak was home to over two-hundred monks. In 1880, the Trappists were expelled from France and offered some land on the Lake of Two Mountains, in Oka, Quebec, by another Order, the Sulpicians. The monks established the Monastery there and, to help sustain it, formed The Oka Agricultural Institute in collaboration with the University of Montreal.

Trappist monks, although they do live a life of quiet contemplation and prayer, removed by-and-large from the outside world, have always been encouraged to support their monasteries by producing goods available to the general public.

Monks from of other countries like Belgium and Holland are famous for producing  beer, and in fact the beer from the Westvleteren Brewery run by the Trappist Monks make what is in some circles regarded as the best beer in the world.

And so it was that, in 1893, when the monks of the Oka abbey found themselves in financial trouble, they found a solution; cheese. As it turns out, one of the monks, Frère Alphonse Juin was from the Port-du-Salut Abbey in Entrammes, where the famous Port-du-Salut cheese was developed. And he had the secret recipe!  Continue »