In-Store Demos, Dec.6-7th, 2014

Creating my five delicious, all natural tomato sauces has been a great journey. It all started with my personal recipe that is made in small batches and gently cooked. The result is a fresh tasting sauce with the perfect balance of acidity and natural sweetness. There are no additives or preservatives and I’ve reduced the salt as much as possible, so be sure to use them within seven days of opening and store in the fridge.

Saturday, Dec.6th, 11-3pm

  • Christine Cushing Sauces »

    Saturday, Dec.6th, 11-3pm

    Creating my five delicious, all natural tomato sauces has been a great journey. It all started with my personal recipe that is made in small batches and gently cooked. The result is a fresh tasting sauce with the perfect balance of acidity and natural sweetness. There are no additives or preservatives and I’ve reduced the salt as much as possible, so be sure to use them within seven days of opening and store in the fridge.

    Creating my five delicious, all natural tomato sauces has been a great journey. It all started with my personal recipe that is made in small batches and gently cooked. The result is a fresh tasting sauce with the perfect balance of acidity and natural sweetness. There are no additives or preservatives and I’ve reduced the salt as much as possible, so be sure to use them within seven days of opening and store in the fridge.
  • The Art Of Pudding »

    Sunday, Dec.7th, 1-5pm

    The King George Christmas pudding is a luscious holiday dessert laden with 12 different fruits and peels. Locally-made, a wonderful ending to any celebration. Just re-heat and serve.

    The King George Christmas pudding is a luscious holiday dessert laden with 12 different fruits and peels. Locally-made, a wonderful ending to any celebration. Just re-heat and serve.


Holiday Recipes from Top Chef Canada – Turkey Breast

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December is here! In the coming weeks we’ll be sharing some delicious holiday recipes from Top Chef Canada champ René Rodriguez. We start off with this unique approach to turkey breast. Rodriguez grew up in Mexico and is heavily influenced by that cuisine and that of his beloved Spain. See what those influences bring to a simple piece of poultry.  Continue »



Finally! A Vegetable Stock That Tastes Great

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Making your own homemade stock is just about the easiest thing you can do in the kitchen, and it is so good, once you get into the habit of making your own it is doubtful you will purchase a pre-made, name brand variety. Prepared vegetarian stocks are also often very high in sodium, to make up for a lack of true flavor. Making your own, flavourful broth will greatly cut down on the amount of salt needed.

We love soup, and whenever we make up a batch we use our own stock; chicken for chicken soup, of course, and beef stock for Scotch broth and French onion soup, and whenever possible we like to use a fragrant, hearty vegetable stock. It is incredibly healthy, economical, it allows us to satisfy our vegetarian and vegan friends, and reduces our dependence on the animal kingdom for at least a meal or two. Furthermore veggie stock is chock full of  water soluble vitamins like vitamin C and thiamine, and is devoid of animal fats that are typically high in calories.

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Buckwheat Is Amazing

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Buckwheat  has been part of the human diet as far back as the seventh millennium B.C., when it was grown in South Asia. From there it made its way to central Asia, Russia, Eastern Europe and Japan. Of all the crops that are cultivated, buckwheat grows at the highest elevations, having been grown in the plateaus of China and Tibet at altitudes unsuitable for rice, wheat or other grasses. Indeed, Buckwheat isn’t even a grass, it is heartier and more closely related to rhubarb, and the little nut that we eat is not a grain, it is an achene-the plant’s fruit that contains its seed.

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A Pectin Primer

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Fall is pulling up its roots and skipping town, and leaving in its wake a bounty of unclaimed gifts; there is still a cornucopia of grapes, rosehips, crabapples, herbs and fruit waiting to be canned and pickled. Many of us hate to see produce -especially produce that we have grown ourselves- go to waste, and thoughts at this time of year turn to ingenious ways of preserving this windfall. For first time canners, the prospect of making jams or jellies can be daunting.

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