Posts Tagged ‘french canadian’

The Most Canadian Supper: Split Pea soup and Molasses Bread

 

IMG_1799

 

When planning ahead for a holiday feast you would do well to also plan for the leftovers. If you’ve had turkey as your centrepiece recently, turkey soup, pot pies and sandwiches are usually the go-to ways to enjoy the feast to the last morsel. This year we had a large family dinner so decided to serve a ham as well. And whenever we have a ham, we follow it up with split pea soup. Continue »



Just Desserts: Chômeur

 

9861ff9c-cc39-4d9e-97b1-81b0938aff90

 

Chômeur is one of those great desserts that says, “Winter in Canada,” or more specifically, “Winter in French Canada.” This classic Québécois dessert was developed in the great depression, the 1930s, when money was scarce but the appetite for little treat was as strong as ever. The name says it all; pouding chômeur literally translates to “unemployment pudding” or “poor man’s pudding.” Maple syrup was always relatively easy to find in the rural areas of Quebec, and it is this easily accessed and quintessential Canadian ingredient that serves as the main spokesperson for this baked pudding. Academics point to this dessert as a classic example of two cultures combining their traditions, in this case Aboriginal and European cuisine. Continue »



Cipaille, A French Canadian Classic

218742-cipaille-ma-grand-mere

 

If it is your turn to host the gang for the Super Bowl party, or any similar gathering, preparing dinner for a large crowd can be a daunting task; you have to come up with a menu that you’re pretty sure everyone will like, something that is delicious and familiar but not old hat or boring. Sometimes it’s exciting to serve something new, something that your guests have never had before. And when it comes to hosting, spending time with your guests is the main idea, you don’t want to spend all your time in the kitchen fussing over cheese soufflé or worrying about whose steak is medium rare and whose is medium well. Maybe next time you have a crowd over for supper, why not put a distinctively Canadian spin on it and serve them Cipaille? Continue »



The Secret Ingredient For Your Next Tourtière

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 4.08.08 PM

 

Meat pies are all the rage these days; Jamaican meat patties are sold in just about every corner store in the city core, and franchises of Australian meat pies are popping up all over the place. But Canada has it’s own famous meat pie, and no discussion of distinctly Canadian foods would be complete without a mention of tourtière, the classic French Canadian pork pie that has been synonymous with comfort food for generations. Recently we discovered a secret ingredient that will make all your future tourtières the best you’ve ever had.

 

Continue »



Grand Maman Claire

 

Kristina Groeger is a food writer and photographer when she’s not working in the pastry department at the Ritz-Carlton. She’s prolific on Twitter and Posterous and maintains a funny food blog called Put a Fork In It. We’re running this piece she wrote, about her boyfriend’s French-Canadian grandmother, in the lead up Mother’s Day and the launch of the newest Apron Strings videos. Enjoy.

painting of Grand Maman Claire by the author

 

 

 

by Kristina Groeger

On a raw, chapped, Canadian Wednesday morning we gather our things in the dark for a three day trip to Montreal from Toronto via our 15 year old Volkswagen Jetta.  I use the orange light of the street because I’m sure my pupils would burst with the thought turning on a light switch.  Half asleep dreams of proper beer on winter patios (cheering for a -real- hockey team) kept me going before I got that first crappy burnt Tim’s coffee in me. Continue »