Posts Tagged ‘local food’

Q&A With A Local Food Expert

 

Should we be worried about food shortages? Does it make a difference what apple I buy? Will I have to give up coffee? How do I bake with spelt?

These are all questions that are going through our heads right now as we try to grocery shop responsibly. To get some clarity, we talked to local chef and food activist, Joshna Maharaj. She has some great advice that will help us all be better consumers during this pandemic and in the months to come. And she has a great recipe for spelt.  Continue »



Bitter Melon: Ornamental Vine & Edible Fruit

Bitter melon vine, showing flower.

Bitter melon vine, showing flower.

I came across this beautiful vine covering a chain link fence recently. The fence itself was almost completely obscured, which is a good thing in my books. (Practical as they are, banishing chain link fences would be one of my first orders as Queen of the World)

The vine leaves themselves are exquisite, finely cut in a way that William Morris—the Arts & Craft designer who took his inspiration from nature—would have loved. The leaf veins, vines and tendrils add to the pleasing array of form. Not only is the vine good at beautifully camouflaging an ugly fence, but it has smallish yellow flowers with the sweetest jasmine fragrance—swoonworthy on a summer evening.

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Question: “Why does the car smell like dinner?”

Tuft of rosemary on olive cutting board

What’s the best way to dry herbs? Hanging upside down on strings is the traditional way. Some people use an oven, but many modern ovens don’t have the low temperatures that herb drying needs. One of the most ingenious and unorthodox ways I’ve heard is to dry herbs using your car as a dehydrator. This tip was gleaned from the excellent edible gardening and growing food podcast called Living HomeGrown with Theresa Loe. With this unusual method you take a bunch of herbs, bundle them, and tie the stems together with a rubber band. (A rubber band works better than string because as the stems shrink the rubber band still holds them tightly.) Don’t make your bunches too big; a bunch of stems about an inch or less across is a good size. Then simply place your herbs around your car. You can use a tray to be tidy, but even placing them on a tea towel would do.

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Plant Profile: Egyptian Walking Onions

egyptian onion

The Baroque twisty-ness of the Walking Onion.

Do these onions really walk like an Egyptian? Read on. This unique, heirloom perennial onion plant (Allium proliferum) serves both an ornamental and edible garden function. Once you have Egyptian walking onions in your garden, you’ll never again have a “we’re out of onions” moment. Your onion supply will be there, faithfully waiting. Yes, the onion bulbs, or bulblets, that grow on the top of its stalk are small, like teeny shallots. Still, they make a great addition to any recipe when you need onions and are out of the big round ones.

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4th Generation Bread Bakers Go Local

green-apple-tuna-sandwich

 

A year ago we wrote about Stonemill Bakehouse’s plans to “go local,” purchasing farmland in Prince Edward County (PEC) with the intention of growing all its grains locally by the year 2018, combining the harvests of over 2000 acres of PEC farmland, a collaboration between local farmers and Stonehouse’s own farm. Continue »