Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Urban Forest: Meet Ivy-Covered Traffic Pole

traffic pole covered in Boston Ivy

A new kind of urban tree?

This is one way to add more greenery to the urban landscape. When ivy wants to climb, let it climb, even if it wants to climb onto traffic poles and light standards. This one has been carefully trimmed to clearly display the rather lengthy traffic rules it proclaims. This natural vegetative exuberance gives us a little taste of what might happen if people disappeared and nature took over our cities. From Discover Magazine:

We might sometimes wonder what our planet would be like if humans suddenly disappeared. Would the seas again fill with fish? Would our concrete cities crumble to dust from the force of tree roots, water, and weeds? How long would it take for our traces to vanish? And if we could answer such questions, would we be more in awe of the changes we have wrought, or of nature’s resilience?

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The Tipping Point and Natural Wildlife Gardens

monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly on verbena bonariensis flower.

Is the desire for natural gardens—along with a concern for pollinators like bees and butterflies—at a tipping point? I’m beginning to think so. Now that so much of our world is technologically driven, urban, half concrete-based and half virtual, there’s an instinctual movement back towards the natural world. The urge is primal—a longing for the natural—for, as Joni Mitchell once wrote, “getting back to the garden”.

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Love The Ravines

ravine in toronto

Toronto ravines make for leafy getaways all over the city.

The Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) works to promote green space in the city, improve our solutions for public transit and waste disposal. They are supporters of a new partnered campaign Love The Ravines, which champions one of Toronto’s best assets, our network of ravines.

Toronto has incredible wilderness spaces that perform important ecological services and are great for recreational activities like running and cycling. Found in the heart of the city, our ravines are little known gems that deserve our love. That’s why TEA has joined with a number of organizations to launch a new campaign called #LovetheRavines.

They have partnered with Green Space, Patagonia, Environmental Defence, Dot Dot Dash and Park People in creating a petition to let Toronto City Council know

that you want our ravines to be added to the protected lands that make up Ontario’s Greenbelt.

I spend a lot of my time walkimg in Toronto’s ravines with my dog. I’m always thrilled to be able to be in a place of pure nature, right within the city limits. Our ravines enhance the livability of the city in countless ways. They need help, and we cant afford to take them for granted.



Interview with a Beekeeper

On Saturday, February 2nd The Toronto Beekeepers Co-op (TBC) will conduct an educational day of urban beekeeping at Foodshare in the former Brockton Academy Building on Croatia Street.

Designed for beginners, this is Beekeeping 101 and will examine all you ever wanted to know about beekeeping but were afraid to ask:  how to create bee friendly gardens; interactive hive and equipment demonstrations; bee biology and lifecycles; hive management and apitherapy – the use of bee products in medicinal healing- are some of the topics that will be covered. Continue »