Posts Tagged ‘preserving’

Pickled Eggs for Fall

 

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We have a friend who lives in Harrowsmith and he has a few hens. And where there are hens there are eggs, lots and lots of eggs. So every time we visit Matthew we get a bunch of farm fresh eggs, which is great. We love eggs, and having a surplus means delicious omelettes, frittatas and a plethora of baked goods that utilize lots of yolks, like custards and French Vanilla ice cream, and the whites get used for meringues and pavlovas. But what to do when the eggs start piling up faster than we can devour them? Why, pickle them of course! Continue »



Question: “Why does the car smell like dinner?”

Tuft of rosemary on olive cutting board

What’s the best way to dry herbs? Hanging upside down on strings is the traditional way. Some people use an oven, but many modern ovens don’t have the low temperatures that herb drying needs. One of the most ingenious and unorthodox ways I’ve heard is to dry herbs using your car as a dehydrator. This tip was gleaned from the excellent edible gardening and growing food podcast called Living HomeGrown with Theresa Loe. With this unusual method you take a bunch of herbs, bundle them, and tie the stems together with a rubber band. (A rubber band works better than string because as the stems shrink the rubber band still holds them tightly.) Don’t make your bunches too big; a bunch of stems about an inch or less across is a good size. Then simply place your herbs around your car. You can use a tray to be tidy, but even placing them on a tea towel would do.

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How To Use Scented Geranium Leaves

scented geranium leaves

Scented geranium leaves that work for culinary and aromatherapy.

One of my favourite herbal plants is a scented rose geranium, which gives off a delicious scent of rose when the leaves are crushed. The houseplants we commonly call geraniums are actually Pelargoniums in botanical-speak. They are tender perennials, originating in South Africa. But no matter the name, the rose geranium is one of my Must Have plants. While it’s not a flowering specimen—the flowers are insignificant—rose geranium is more than worth it to grow for the scent alone.

In nature, there are some plants and flowers that have complex aromas and flavors. Probably the best example of this is wine grapes. Just think of all the words to describe your favorite wines: berry, chocolate, citrus, oaky, grassy. The list is almost endless. In the world of herbs, scented geraniums are similar.

I use it as a ‘walk by” form of aromatherapy, grabbing a leaf and burying my nose in it, for a shot of wondrous olfactory bliss. This is the kind of thing you need in November, or any winter day, really. The scent is similar to the Attar of Rose scent, a true rose fragrance.

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Flight of the Concord Grapes

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Sad but true, summer is drawing to a close. And though most Ontario fruit has come and gone, there are still a few late summer windfalls that are just coming into their own. Grapes, for example, are a fruit practically synonymous with fall, and no self-respecting cornucopia would be caught dead without having clusters of deep purple, pale green or dusky blue grapes spilling out of them. Continue »



A Pectin Primer

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Fall is pulling up its roots and skipping town, and leaving in its wake a bounty of unclaimed gifts; there is still a cornucopia of grapes, rosehips, crabapples, herbs and fruit waiting to be canned and pickled. Many of us hate to see produce -especially produce that we have grown ourselves- go to waste, and thoughts at this time of year turn to ingenious ways of preserving this windfall. For first time canners, the prospect of making jams or jellies can be daunting.

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