Posts Tagged ‘quebecois’

Pantry and Palate: An Acadian Cookbook

by Kerry Knight

 

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Perusing the pages of Simon Thibault’s first cookbook, Pantry and Palate- Remembering and Rediscovering Acadian Food  is very much like leafing through a history text. A delicious, mouthwatering text to be sure, and one that serves as a reminder of not only our amazing past, but is in itself a lively, relevant book of useful and tempting recipes. It is history come alive, ready to be cooked with love and care and eaten with relish. Or at least chutney, maybe rhubarb chutney.

Don’t worry, Thibault has a recipe for that. Continue »



Just Desserts: Chômeur

 

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Chômeur is one of those great desserts that says, “Winter in Canada,” or more specifically, “Winter in French Canada.” This classic Québécois dessert was developed in the great depression, the 1930s, when money was scarce but the appetite for little treat was as strong as ever. The name says it all; pouding chômeur literally translates to “unemployment pudding” or “poor man’s pudding.” Maple syrup was always relatively easy to find in the rural areas of Quebec, and it is this easily accessed and quintessential Canadian ingredient that serves as the main spokesperson for this baked pudding. Academics point to this dessert as a classic example of two cultures combining their traditions, in this case Aboriginal and European cuisine. Continue »



Cipaille, A French Canadian Classic

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If it is your turn to host the gang for the Super Bowl party, or any similar gathering, preparing dinner for a large crowd can be a daunting task; you have to come up with a menu that you’re pretty sure everyone will like, something that is delicious and familiar but not old hat or boring. Sometimes it’s exciting to serve something new, something that your guests have never had before. And when it comes to hosting, spending time with your guests is the main idea, you don’t want to spend all your time in the kitchen fussing over cheese soufflé or worrying about whose steak is medium rare and whose is medium well. Maybe next time you have a crowd over for supper, why not put a distinctively Canadian spin on it and serve them Cipaille? Continue »